Posts Tagged ‘permissions’

When I try and view my website I get an HTTP Error 403 – Forbidden message.

This error indicates that there is no valid home page, or that permissions have been set on a page which does not allow you to view it.

Cause 1: Missing or wrongly named index file

When you don’t specify a file name when accessing a site (eg visiting the domain directly as most do at http://www.domainname.com), the server searches through a list of default filenames and will display the first one it finds. Common default names are index.php, default.htm, index.htm and index.html – The first page of your website should use one of these names, with all lowercase letters.

When we create your web hosting account, we place a simple index.html file on the server so that there is something there before you upload your site. If you delete this file and don’t replace it, then you will see the error message above. To fix this, ensure that the first page in you site is called index.html and that the file is uploaded to the public_html directory.

Cause 2: Incorrect Access Control Settings

This error will also be displayed if the directory access settings for your site’s root directory are set with access criteria which you do not meet. Usually these settings are contained in a file called “.htaccess”. This file is sometimes generated manually, but can also be configured by some web development tools, such as MS FrontPage.

If you are using FrontPage, then you should alter the web permissions using this program, and republish your site. In most other cases, manually removing the .htaccess file usually solves the problem.

My CGI/ASP/PHP script is giving an error when trying to write to a file.

This applies to Linux hosting accounts only.

This is almost certainly down to incorrect permissions on your script or file. Please see the following information on how to set permissions on files:

Doing a CHMOD (changing a file’s permissions) is the setting of access privileges for a file. This tutorial shows the process in one of the most common FTP applications called WS_FTP but the process is very similar with other ftp clients. Only Perl scripts need to have permissions changed to run.

First connect to your hosting via FTP using the settings provided in your setup email. Click on the “public_html” directory to open the area where your website is placed.

Next click on the directory and right-click on the file you would like to set permissions for. The right-click menu is then displayed, and by clicking the “CHMOD” option we get to the main part of doing a CHMOD.

The new menu that appears has three columns – Owner, Group, and Other. Each column has three checkboxes below them – Read, Write, and Execute. In the “Owner” column, check all three boxes. In the “Group” column check the first and third checkboxes. In the “Other” column, check the first and third boxes.

Finally, click “OK” to complete the CHMOD. Test your script again by calling it from your web browser. Everything should work correctly, but if you are still seeing an Error 500 Server Error then it is not because of your permissions but more the coding within the script itself

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